Responsive Logos

Posted on Sunday, November 10, 2019 by Brianna

Ten years ago, web designers first started discussing “responsive design,” aka ensuring that websites created with desktops in mind would load legibly on smartphones and tablets. The rapid rise of mobile browsing has created critical usability issues for traditional websites. Designers and developers began experimenting with various ways to make designs that would adapt to all devices as a one-website-fits-all solution. This laid the groundwork for what would become known as “responsive design.”

The main idea here is to make sure the brand is readable and legible at smaller sizes on all devices or print mediums. Digitally, a logo should look recognizable on a desktop, tablet, or phone. This same scaling is similar to the issue that has existed in print, where a logo must fit on billboards, letterheads and business cards. In a world where screens come in all sizes and shapes, we need logos that can make an elegant and efficient use of any screen space. They use more or fewer elements, and those elements can be organized in various ways to match the environment.

Below, check out how some household brand names have transitioned their logo overtime to become less complex, involving fewer design elements and playing up the iconic ones that are most recognizable no matter what the scale. Even the simplest original logo below, Chanel, can be made simple.

 

What do millennials want from hotels?

Posted on Thursday, October 10, 2019 by Kelsey

A brief overview of the latest hospitality trends for leisure travelers ages 22-37

Wifi, free and fast

Even though millennials will book trips to “unplug” and “get off the grid,” they still want to be able to check their email before they go to bed (and maybe even post a photo or two). According to the New York Times, a new branch of millennial-targeted hotels by Starwood called Aloft makes free Wifi a priority throughout their establishments—from rooms to poolside. Not only should the Wifi be free, but it should also be reliable and fast. Skift says, “Millennials are not necessarily technologically savvy; they’re technologically dependent. That dependence is merely a conduit through which to dream, research, share and experience travel. It is not the travel experience itself.”

Instagram-able amenities // Adventurous experiences

Having gorgeous views and cozy rooms is important for perpetuating millennial traffic through your hotels. With nearly 60% of active Instagram users being millennials, there’s a good chance of your hotel ending up as a post…if it makes the cut. For those who don’t feel like their ambiance appeals to a younger demographic, never fear: try marketing your destination as an experience more than a place to sleep, like international hostel company Generator. According to Forbes: “They make use of inspirational content to make people desire adventure and exploration….You’ll notice a distinct lack of photos of bed and breakfast tables. The company is selling itself on being an experience.” Adventure is more important to them than rest, at least according to this year’s AARP leisure travel report, which states that millennials are the least likely general to be motivated by the need to relax and rejuvenate (28% vs 47% GenX and 38% of Boomers). This is because they are more apt to look at vacation as an opportunity for adventure or to go somewhere new, so it’s equally advantageous to put the splendor of the area on the forefront of your marketing if you’re lacking in, say, towel-swans.

Authenticity

In the era of Airbnb, “some companies…have capitalized on the sensibilities of the traveling millennial—promoting the ideas of flexibility and local authenticity.” Millennials want the “real” experience of an area, which could be its uniquely weird food, gorgeous lake views or even the charming hotelier with a folksy accent. A room within walking distance to a frequented bar or the locals’ favorited beach should be touted on your website (and if your hotel is in the middle of a parking lot next to a chain like Perkins, best not to mention it).

Online booking

Speaking of Airbnb, millennials want to be able to browse hotel amenities and cabin rentals, and then book, without having to physically speak to anyone. According to the same previously mentioned NYTimes article, “44% of millennials prefer booking hotel services from a mobile phone” — and that’s through clicks, mind you. Ergo, it’s important that your website is mobile-friendly and offers the ability to book everything online.

 

When communicating with customers, remember the basics

Posted on Saturday, September 21, 2019 by Kate

Today’s consumers are bombarded with advertising everywhere they look, especially on social media. Paid advertising has taken over newsfeeds on nearly every social platform. While paid posts are necessary to increase web traffic and sales, brands must also maintain social pages with appealing organic content to build real relationships with potential customers.

Relevance

One of the biggest challenges brands face on social media today is reaching audiences with organic content. While it’s critical to run paid posts, brands can benefit from developing strong organic posts. However, they can’t simply share information about their products or services to capture the attention of their audience. Even though someone follows the brand, they might not want to see posts about the brand on their timeline every day. This means brands should think about sharing information that serves their audience. For example, a vegan clothing brand profits from selling t-shirts, but it keeps its followers engaged by not only sharing photos of the shirts, but also sharing vegan recipes and lifestyle content. Diversifying the types of information included in posts keeps followers interested and engaged and strengthens brand identities.

Conversation

Brands can form strong ties with followers and create customers by talking to them online. Whether it’s helping solve a customer’s problem via Facebook or directing someone to a website, small interactions can go a long way. Brands can start dialogue and increase engagement on their posts by posing questions to their followers. They can also utilize poll features to ask questions and get their followers thinking about the brand or topics related to their products. Organic posts that receive likes and comments tend to receive favor from algorithms, so the more people that are interacting with a post, the more people who will see it. Brands should make an effort to start conversations to create positive impressions and increase awareness through customer interaction.

Authenticity

In a world of curated, calculated messaging everywhere we look, social media users (especially young ones) have become more critical of advertising. Brands can combat the anti-advertising stigma by creating content, both organic and paid, that doesn’t use a “sales-y” voice. Many brands have chosen to post from their social media accounts as if the brand is an individual person. When taking on this voice, they’re able to act more personable and approachable, and they’re more easily able to start conversations with followers. They also enact the 80/20 rule, which means that only 20 percent of the content they share relates to products and promotions, while the other 80 percent is dedicated to sharing curated content, entertainment and useful information with followers.

Design Trends: Cold Industrial Meets Warm Vintage

Posted on Thursday, August 15, 2019 by Alan

Graphic designers are combining two classic designs to create a familiar but fresh look. The combination of industrial edges and vintage illustrations evoke an air of sophistication while inviting consumers in almost as if to say, “You can be part of our club.”

These two components – industrial, which is sharp, edgy and dark, and vintage with its warm, nostalgic and inviting vibes – are quite opposite when they stand alone. But when combined, they complement each other.


Web Trend: Inventive Typography

Posted on Saturday, July 13, 2019 by Ben Jones

When we think of the text on a website, we think of it as secondary to the imagery and functionality of the page. It provides context and important information. (“Like what you see? To inquire about availability at this lodging property, call 715-555-5555 or visit their website…”). It prompts users to take action. While this is still true, typography—the design of the font—is becoming increasingly important aesthetically in the space of image-dominant websites.

Tried-and-true (and perhaps a little hackneyed) websites place the text and images on a grid pattern. Newer sites try to create more stylish and out-of-box layouts that use asymmetrical patterns and a variety of media alongside carefully selected typeface. Below, see an example of an older website that segments its text and images like a grid next to a newer site that breaks from the form.

Additionally, now that our computer screens are sharper (even on mobile), traditional ideas around using sans serif fonts for legibility are changing. Previously, screens lacked sharpness and serif fonts were more difficult to read because of the multitude of small lines appended to each individual letter. See below.

Keep in mind, however: trendy designs are only as good as their legibility and the user experience. Visitors should be able to find information quickly without scrolling; they should be able to read text without squinting or turning their heads sideways. For this reason, it’s better to play it safe with longer paragraphs of text like blog posts.

Pilch & Barnet keeps the user experience in mind when choosing fonts in all instances big and small: from designing logos to coding websites.

The Importance of Paying to Promote

Posted on Thursday, June 20, 2019 by Kate

More than 60 billion brands now have Facebook pages. Not so long ago, on average, 17% of a brand’s fan base saw its posts organically (meaning without paying to promote them). Now that number is hovering closer to 2% for many brands.

Facebook prioritizes relevant content, with the hope of providing the best user experience possible. Therefore, strong content will always be important, especially given how much noise there is from competing brands. But with 2% organic reach becoming the norm, paying to promote posts has become an absolute necessity.

Recognizing this decline on the horizon, Pilch & Barnet has been incorporating promoted posts into our clients Facebook advertising for years. With a modest budget, and careful moderation, the results of these ads speak for themselves, to the tune of several thousand engagements each quarter, along with strong and consistent reach among fans. And, the benefits keep multiplying, because the more engagement a page has, the more likely its posts are to show up organically in the future, at no extra cost!

We look forward to sharing your message with more potential visitors in 2019!

Design Trend: Less is not more

Posted on Friday, April 12, 2019 by Brianna

Design trends are moving away from the minimalist look and embracing influences of the 80’s and 90’s, making way for experimentation with retro patterns and hues. Bright, bold colors and gradients have taken the place of crisp neutrals and soft fades are replacing solid lines. These changes are refreshing to the eyes and help capture attention.

Instead of utilizing starkly different colors, similar hues are layered to create subtle contrasts and natural gradients that draw in the viewer and guide their eyes as they navigate the website. Bold tones, shadows and layers create depth in a 2D space. These elements are interesting to the eye to keep the viewer engaged. Pilch & Barnet has embraced this theme by integrating bold color palettes and gradients into logos and other elements for our clients.

Web Trends: Give the Customer What They Want…On the Go

Posted on Friday, March 15, 2019 by Ben Jones

In 2018, mobile surpassed desktop for time spent on the web as a record 77 percent of Americans own smartphones. As a result, mobile optimization became more important than ever to brands hoping to gain loyal customers through the web. Whether consumers are shopping for clothing or hunting for homes, the experience they have can make or break decisions, especially when it comes to choosing how to spend money. Moving forward, web designers must prioritize mobile optimization to ensure potential customers can access information efficiently from their devices.

Common and necessary components of mobile-optimized sites include:

  1. Clickability: Sites designed for desktop have small buttons that can be difficult to press when using a touch screen mobile device, so designers must create buttons large enough for clicking with fingers.
  2. Readability: Text should be fitted to the screen. Site visitors should not need to scroll, zoom, etc. to read the information on a website.
  3. Searchability: Providing the visitor with the fastest route to the information they need will improve their experience. Designers should include a “search” bar to make websites user-friendly.

Keeping all of this in mind, Pilch & Barnet now designs all websites with a mobile-first approach.

Look who joined the team!

Posted on Thursday, February 28, 2019 by Ben Jones

Ms. Kelley grew up in the business. Her family once owned an advertising agency, and her parents both worked in creative agencies. Even though she told herself as a teenager that she wasn’t going to follow in her family’s footsteps, funny story—it turns out she ended up loving the work (and was very good at it, to boot). Our office—and our clients—are all the better for it, as Ms. Kelley truly is a creative professional and her hard work and talents are put to good use on projects of all sorts.

Travelers Don’t Want to be Casual Observers

Posted on Friday, February 15, 2019 by Alan

Travelers want to be refreshed in 2019; new sights, unique events and educational experiences will be the deciding factors as adventurers make their travel plans in the coming year.

Au revoir, Paris

The road-less-traveled is growing in popularity as the hustle and bustle of cities feels all too familiar to seasoned travelers. Whether they’re looking for value or an escape from the noise, these explorers want to get off the beaten path. In addition to that, people feel the need to share photos of their trip on social media, but they don’t want to post the same Eiffel Tower picture everyone has seen 20 times. People want to be the trailblazer of their friend group, which means trying something new and unique.

Draw Them In

Souvenirs often come in the form of snow globes and t-shirts, but travelers are looking for something they can’t pick up at the gift shop: knowledge. More specifically, they want to learn more about art and the local artists who contribute to local culture. As people yearn for tangible, off-screen experiences, art is becoming an even more relevant tool for tourist destinations to use to draw visitors in. Permanent exhibits and temporary installations offer the enriching experiences tourists desire, and they provide something that will last long after the return home.

Get It To-Go

Classes, concerts, conferences, and other events add substance to vacations and offer opportunities for growth. Like the appeal of art exhibits, these experiences enhance the value of a trip because they have value beyond good memories. Tourists want to leave their mark by participating in classes and discussions, and they also want to use it when they’re back home. Maybe they learn how to cook a local dish or attend a seminar where they network with like-minded individuals. These opportunities create incentive for visitors to make the journey and provides them with lasting value.