5 Reasons Tourism in Wisconsin Rocks

Posted on Monday, April 30, 2018 by Kelsey

Vacations are today. Tourism is forever.

When people travel to Wisconsin, they adopt a more positive view of the state and all it has to offer. According to the Wisconsin Department of  Tourism, “Travelers who have visited Wisconsin in the past two years rate the state much higher than those who have not visited the state.” The positive sentiment and word-of-mouth marketing has potential to entice others to not just to travel, but live, work and start businesses in Wisconsin. When that happens, the impact of tourism reaches far beyond a one-time visit.

Tourism gives (spending) power to the people.

According to the state, tourism generated $1.5 billion in state and local revenues, saving taxpayers an average of $650 per household. With an extra $650, you could buy 36 tickets to a Brewers game, spend a weekend in the Dells, or buy 120 pounds of brats. In other words, Wisconsinites can thank tourists for a whole lot of fun.

Tourism supports your favorite restaurant.

Name your favorite Wisconsin pastimes. Odds are, eating and drinking make the list. You’ve got tourism to thank for that—the tourism economy supports 35% of all recreation jobs and 23% of all food & beverage jobs in Wisconsin. So next time you’re out at a restaurant with your friends after a day of fun, think of all the people who helped make your day awesome. Their jobs might not exist without tourism but, thanks to more than 100 million annual visitors, we’re able to continue enjoying cheese curds from the comfort of someone else’s kitchen.

Tourism employs people across industries.

Tourism supports many jobs in the recreation and food industries, but its operations extend into other businesses including manufacturing, printing, food and beverage suppliers, and business services. The Department of Tourism explains: “Tourism directly and indirectly supports 193,500 jobs in Wisconsin.” Without the industry’s contribution, the state’s unemployment rate would more than double to 10.1 percent.

Vacation is good for the soul, and it’s good for the economy too.

American workers are taking less time off of work than we used to, and it’s hurting businesses. According to the U.S. Travel Association and Project: Time Off, American workers reported taking just 16.2 days of vacation a year, almost a full week less than they did 20 years ago. This stockpile of unused paid leave contributes to worker burnout and even larger balance sheet liabilities that directly affect a company’s bottom line. Tourism means taking time off work to explore and, while you’re at it, spend money. That money keeps the economy rocking. So, take that extra week off. You deserve it.